Gorebridge to Haddington (alternative route)

Route out – Gorebridge to Newtongrange to Newbattle to Whitecraig to Musselburgh to Prestonpans to Port Seaton to Longniddry to Haddington. For route map click here.

Route back – Haddington to Gifford to Humbie to Fala to Fala Dam to Tynehead to Middleton to Fushiebridge to Gorebridge. For route map click here.

  • Weather – mostly dry and reasonably bright with some sunny spells. Warm enough and not much wind. One annoying shower in the afternoon though.
  • Distance travelled – 50.72 miles
  • Riding time – 5 hours 5 minutes
  • Maximum speed – 30.9 mph
  • Average speed – 9.9 mph

Sunday was the first non-school day when the weather forecast was good so Dad and I decided to make the most of it and go for our longest ride of the year, a trip to Haddington in East Lothian but going a much more round about way than we did last year. We were out of bed and onto the road by 7:15am, speeding downhill through Newtongrange and Newbattle before turning right at the mini roundabout just after Newbattle Abbey. This took us through a residential area and then, after lifting our bikes over a fence, we joined the path of National Cycle Route no.1. This is a lovely section of route no.1, mainly off road, taking you through the golf course and then along an old railway line to the village of Whitecraig. Here, there’s a short section on road but route no.1 quickly takes you off road again next to the River Esk. The path soon splits at a bridge over the river and here we said goodbye to route no.1 and followed the River Esk path right into the centre of Musselburgh, passing a nice waterfall and going under a railway bridge along the way.

From Musselburgh we followed a combination of the well signposted routes of Cycle Route no.76 and the John Muir Way, staying off road almost all the way to Longniddry. We’ve been this way before so won’t go into detail here apart from to say it is a really nice route with amazing views to Edinburgh and Fife and is highly recommended for cyclists of all ages and abilities. Just next to Longniddry railway station, we followed the blue signpost for the Longniddry to Haddington Railway path which is a continuation of Route 76. We timed this perfectly, just in time to see a Virgin Train speeding through on its way to London. The path itself is probably OK to cycle on in the summer, but we discovered that it was very muddy (and uphill) for about 3 miles or so, so it wasn’t much fun. Thankfully, at Haddington the path becomes tarmac and then joins onto a minor road going back downhill until you reach the main A6093 road. We crossed over this road and followed the cycle route signs through a housing estate until we ended up on the River Tyne Walkway. This was a bit muddy again but we saw swans and another waterfall here and it was actually quite pleasant. We stopped on a bench for a snack next to the waterfall and it was then that Dad noticed that my front tyre had a puncture. Luckily Dad always brings spare inner tubes and it didn’t take him long to the muddy wheel off, the new tube in and the wheel back on. It did, however, take him an age to pump up the new tube with his rubbishy little hand pump. I was starting to get bored waiting and Dad’s right arm was knackered by the time he was finished. Just as well he’d brought 2 Yorkie bars with him today!

We left Haddington along the B6369, passing Lennoxlove House on the way. This road features a couple of right-angle bends and would be a lovely road to cycle on if it wasn’t nearly all uphill and also so busy with traffic. Never mind, it was only about 4 miles to the historic village of Gifford, where we stopped to admire some amazing old-fashioned road signs and a field of crocuses before having our lunch of boiled eggs, oatcakes and carrot sticks. After lunch we followed the B6355 and B6368 roads until we reached Humbie. These are much quieter and more pleasant roads for cycling on, with good surfaces and lots of ups and downs to keep it interesting. There are some good views of the Lammermuir hills too. The village of Humbie is a small place but it does have a nice-looking coffee shop type place called the Humbie Hub. We didn’t go in but did stop to admire their impressive sign. Whilst there, Dad spotted another amazing sign – an old Shell garage sign which appeared to be growing inside a giant hedge.

A mile or so after Humbie, we turned off onto the B6457 which took us back into Midlothian and Fala Village. Here, we turned right onto the narrow road that takes you very fast down the hill to Fala Dam before climbing back up the other side equally steeply but much more slowly… At the top we stopped to photograph some unusual looking sheep-goat-things with giant horns on their heads before continuing the short distance until the road reached cycling hell, also known as the A68. We’re not daft enough to cycle on this road as it is far too busy and the traffic travels too fast so we stayed on the pavement at the side of the road for a hundred yards or so before crossing carefully over onto the the B6458 which took us, slightly uphill, all the way to Tynehead. We had to cycle in the rain for a mile or 2 but it did mean we got a great view of a rainbow afterwards. From Tynehead we went straight on, taking the recently resurfaced and extremely smooth B6367 for a couple of miles until it reached the main A7 road. Unlike the A68, the A7 is reasonably safe to venture onto on a bike, especially on the downhill sections when you can go quite fast. It’s also a nice wide road with a good surface and nowhere near as busy. Anyway, we headed north on the A7 for about 1.5 miles, downhill and very fast before turning off at the minor road to Middleton. There’s not much in Middleton except 2 farms and a Cycle Route no.1 signpost but from there we had a very fun few miles of fast downhill cycling on a deserted back road (reaching over 30mph at one point). We eventually re-joined the A7 for a few hundred yards of downhill speeding until we turned off onto the quiet road to Fushiebridge. We saw our second train of the day here on the Borders Railway so that was well timed again. Then it was all uphill along a narrow and rather bumpy road which took us back to Gorebridge, near the top of Lady Brae. We then just had a short freewheel down another hill to get home. To Dad’s delight, we even made it home just in time to watch the football on the TV…

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